Depression Blues

Album: Lucky Thirteen (1993)
  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • Though it sat on the shelf for a decade before being recorded, "Depression Blues" is considered by many Young aficionados to be among the Canadian's better songs.

    It was originally recorded in 1983 for the first iteration of Young's country album Old Ways. That album was made in a strange ecosystem, as Geffen Records was suing Young for not producing Rock and Roll content they believed was marketable. Young resisted, of course, and vowed that the more the label pushed, the more country music he'd make.

    By the time Old Ways was actually recorded two years after its initial inception (the version Young refers to as Old Ways II, with I being that first, never-released version), "Depression Blues" for some reason was cut.

    The song was then almost released on a Farm Aid EP, but that whole project got scrapped. Young had been a shaping force in Farm Aid, the annual music festival that started raising money for American independent farmers in 1985.

    "Depression Blues" finally saw the light of day when it ended up being one of four previously unreleased tracks included on the compilation album Lucky Thirteen.
  • The title "Depression Blues" makes it easy to interpret the song as being during the Great Depression of 1930s America, and Johnny Rogan, for one, did exactly this in The Complete Guide to the Music of Neil Young.

    Looked at as a song originally intended for Old Ways, however, and looking closely at the lyrics, it seems more likely that the song is about rural life in the 1980s time period when it was written. Much of Old Ways is concerned with the death of small-town America, particularly farm country. In the 1980s, independent farmers were having an increasingly difficult time keeping their family farms afloat. One verse, in particular, lends credence to this interpretation:

    Goin' back to school
    Savin' up my tuition
    Gonna rewrite all the rules
    On the old blackboard


    Going back to school for a new education sounds more like something from the 1980s than the Great Depression of the 1930s, when formal education was out of reach for most of the working class.

    Also, the buying up of real estate by "somebody nobody knows" implies faceless out-of-town corporate entities, which were also a subject of growing cultural concern in the 1980s.
  • In describing "Depression Blues," Jimmy McDonough, author of the Young biography titled Shakey, writes, "Young's lonesome harmonica and even lonesomer vocal evoke a dusty nowheresville where the jobs have vanished and the funky downtown movie theater has been replaced by a faceless shopping-mall megaplex."
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Marvin GayeFact or Fiction

Did Marvin try out with the Detroit Lions? Did he fake crazy to get out of military service? And what about the cross-dressing?

Alan Merrill of The ArrowsSongwriter Interviews

In her days with The Runaways, Joan Jett saw The Arrows perform "I Love Rock And Roll," which Alan Merrill co-wrote - that story and much more from this glam rock pioneer.

Taylor DayneSongwriter Interviews

Taylor talks about "The Machine" - the hits, the videos and Clive Davis.

Zac HansonSongwriter Interviews

Zac tells the story of Hanson's massive hit "MMMbop," and talks about how brotherly bonds effect their music.

Steely DanFact or Fiction

Did they really trade their guitarist to The Doobie Brothers? Are they named after something naughty? And what's up with the band name?

Music Video Director David HoganSong Writing

David talks about videos he made for Prince, Alabama, Big & Rich, Sheryl Crow, DMB, Melissa Etheridge and Sisters of Mercy.