Lines

Album: Moderne Incidental (2009)

Songfacts®:

  • This is a track from French indie rock band Neimo's second album, Moderne Incidental. All their songs are sung in English. The band's lead singer Bruno Alexandre, explained to Reuters that the band chose to compose the songs in English because, "Rock is based on sweat, spontaneity and energy. Sorry, but Rock and Roll was born in the United States."
  • Alexandre told Clash magazine this song concerns the fact that, "you get to a certain age and you realise that you can recall certain lines and sentences that you were told through your life." He added that the track originated from a period in his life when he was feeling "pretty down about everything and a friend told me, 'Do you know what? You're a good man.' Just one sentence made me feel better."
  • Another significant line from the song for Alexandre is, "Tell me are you a boy or a girl?" He explained to Clash: "I looked and talked like a girl until I was twelve and I was mocked at school for it. This made me what I am now. I still recall all those lines, just like the first time you hear 'I love you'."

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