Along for the Ride

Album: How Country Feels (2013)

Songfacts®:

  • Randy Houser wrote this song during one the lowest points of his career and he penned it partly in order to "encourage" himself. "To me, ['Along for the Ride'] is not saying 'just throw your hands up and let whatever happens happen.' It's believing that good things are happening," he told Radio.com. "I wrote that song during a period when things weren't good, but I still believed that things would get good, just had faith."

    Houser began writing the tune alone one night, but got stuck. The next morning, he called on his friends Zac Brown and Levi Lowrey to help him finish it. "That's the way songs go sometimes," he said. "Sometimes it takes a team to put the puzzle together."
  • "Along for the ride" conjures up the image of a passive passenger allowing something of pleasure or interest to happen. The phrase is of US origin dating from the 1950s.

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