Color Of Right
by Rush

Album: Test For Echo (1997)
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  • Lyrics
  • Regarding the last two lines:
    Gravity and distance change the passage of light
    Gravity and distance change the color of right
    Neil Peart: "The lyrics that surround it are rather unremarkable, and the context of the song seems to cast these lines in the sense of "don't be self-righteous" - something rather uninteresting. But I have used the above metaphor, changed it around, suited it to my needs. I am interested in the double sense of gravity and distance. Physical vs. metaphysical. I take the second meaning of the quotation as another way of saying there is a great difference between theory and practice. When things are serious, when we see them up close, they look different." >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Mike - Mountlake Terrace, Washington
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Comments: 5

  • Larry from Ft. Pierce, FlAgain, as is prevalent in any good song--in other words, all Rush songs--if it can cause you to pause, reflect, and see how it relates to your life and experiences, then it merits importance. Rush consistently does these things in its songs.
  • Rufus from Wheeling, WvMy favorite off Test for Echo, next to the title track. "Take it easy on me now
    I'd be there if I could
    I'm so full of what is right
    I can't see what is good"
  • Avlight from Anytown, NcAccording to an interview, Neil did for the album release, the song came of a conversation he had with his daughter (who had came home on break from Law School) about what her professors were teaching her. The Color of Right is a legal term in the judicial system.
  • John from Asheville, NcI don't mind this song. A bit underrated or dismissed. I usually listen and realize I've missed something or at least find myself enjoying it. *Good* Rush song. Not bad. Not brilliant.
  • Julie from Perth, NvOdd song.
    very different.
see more comments

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