Wig-Wam Bam

Album: Greatest Hits (1972)
Charted: 4
  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • This is a rocked-up version of Henry Longfellow's 1855 Hiawatha story. Written by Glam Rock architects Nicky Chinn and Mike Chapman, the song was described in Bomp magazine as "a monument to ultracommercial rock & roll triviality."
  • This was the Sweet's sixth consecutive hit in the UK and the first on which the entire band was permitted to perform. Session musicians were used for their previous five.
  • On various TV shows and promotional appearances, Sweet would perform this song wearing ridiculous Indian costumes.
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Comments: 7

  • Alicia from Limbo@Stella Ha I also thought that it was "silver screen"! But for me it still fits with my personal interpretation;)
  • Stella from London, United KingdomI thought this was a song about the portrayal of Indians in Westerns (movies) until recently when I learned they were singing 'Till she took him to the silver stream' and not 'the silver screen'.
  • Zabadak from London, EnglandThis was the first single by the band whereby the Management "allowed" them to actually play their instruments, even though they were all perfectly capable.
  • Sarah from St. Paul , MnThe first verse is about Hiawatha and Minnehaha (not Mini or Minnie - it means waterfall or Laughing Waters in Dakota), fictional characters from The Song of Hiawatha by Longfellow. The second verse is about Running Bear and Little White Dove from the song "Running Bear" written by the Big Bopper.
  • Mark from London, EnglandAlthough the first verse relates to Hiawatha, the second is about Running Bear and Mini Haha.
  • Mark from London, EnglandThe band would play (or mime) on TV dressed in full Native American gear.
  • Mark from London, EnglandThe guitar riff for this song was taken from the Peter Gunn theme.
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