Inside Looking Out

Album: Absolute Animals 1964-1968 (1966)
Charted: 12 34

Songfacts®:

  • In 1966 The Animals changed labels to Decca and started writing their own material. This song was one of their most adventurous, with every bar in the same minor chord. Frontman Eric Burdon admitted to the NME in an interview to publicize its release that they took "a liberty" with this number. He added: "It's the first number we've recorded without a tune. It originates from a Mississippi prison song, the kind of blues we've always wanted to do."
  • Grand Funk Railroad covered this on their 1969 Grand Funk album, and it remains a cornerstone of the band's live concerts today.
  • Like The Who, The Kinks, and The Beatles, The Animals were a British invasion band that made a big impact in America. When we asked Eric Burdon, how The Animals compared to these groups, he replied: "I thought that we were darker than any of the other bands initially. I thought The Kinks were fantastic though. Their attitude outstripped the Stones and the Beatles." (Read more in our interview with Eric Burdon)

Comments: 1

  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn February 6th 1966, the Animals performed "Inside - Looking Out" on the CBS-TV program 'The Ed Sullivan Show'...
    Exactly two weeks later on February 20th it entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #96; and on March 27th it peaked at #34 (for 1 week) and spent 7 weeks on the Top 100...
    Was track 6 of side 1 on their fourth studio album, 'Animalization', the album reached #20 on Billboard's Top 200 Albums chart...
    Two other tracks from the album also made the Top 100; "Don't Bring Me Down" (at #12) and "See See Rider" (at #10)...
    When "See See Rider" was released as a 45 RPM record the label read 'Eric Burton and the Animals'; all prior releases it was just the 'Animals'...
    R.I.P. original bassist 'Chas' Chandler (1938 - 1996).
see more comments

Editor's Picks

Susanna Hoffs - "Eternal Flame"

Susanna Hoffs - "Eternal Flame"They're Playing My Song

The Prince-penned "Manic Monday" was the first song The Bangles heard coming from a car radio, but "Eternal Flame" is closest to Susanna's heart, perhaps because she sang it in "various states of undress."

Sarah Brightman

Sarah BrightmanSongwriter Interviews

One of the most popular classical vocalists in the land is lining up a trip to space, which is the inspiration for many of her songs.

Adam Young of Owl City

Adam Young of Owl CitySongwriter Interviews

Is Owl City on a quest for another hit like "Fireflies?" Adam answers that question and explains the influences behind many others.

Steven Tyler of Aerosmith

Steven Tyler of AerosmithSongwriter Interviews

Tyler talks about his true love: songwriting. How he identifies the beauty in a melody and turns sorrow into art.

Band Names

Band NamesFact or Fiction

Was "Pearl" Eddie Vedder's grandmother, and did she really make a hallucinogenic jam? Did Journey have a contest to name the group? And what does KISS stand for anyway?

Supertramp founder Roger Hodgson

Supertramp founder Roger HodgsonSongwriter Interviews

Roger tells the stories behind some of his biggest hits, including "Give a Little Bit," "Take the Long Way Home" and "The Logical Song."