Do It Like This

Album: The Beginning (2010)
  • This is the first promo single from The Beginning, the sixth studio album by American Hip-Hop group The Black Eyed Peas. The song was released on November 15, 2010.
  • The song was months in the making and like the Peas two-part hit single "Imma Be," was created by splicing together two club-ready jams into one five minute track. Will.i.am told Spin magazine that he wanted to canvass fan's opinions about some leftover beats he had from working with Usher on "OMG" before using them on Black Eyed Peas' new tunes. After DJ'ing one night in Toronto, the Will brought back some clubbers to play them his creations. "I told them, 'Don't be afraid to say its whack. Don't tell me it's cool because you're being polite,'" he said. "So I played them music and everybody was like, 'Ugh!'"

    Despite the negative reaction, Will.i.am told Spin magazine that he stands by the beats he created for this song. "I don't care if you've shot a billion people and I don't care if you've sold crack to the Pope," he said. "That beat is harder than any attitude or any freakin' mug-shot face. It goes to a place no hip-hopper would go to right now."

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