She's So Bendable

Album: Stir The Blood (2009)
  • This is a track from New York alternative rock band The Bravery's third studio album, Stir The Blood. Vocalist Sam Endicott told Billboard magazine "I'd say it's more like the first record (in 2005) in that there's a lot of electronics on it, but it still sounds very human. It's also like the first record in that it's a party album. It's uptempo, fun music, although it does have a range of things."
  • This song was penned by the band's bass player Mike Hindert. Endicott commented to Billboard that it "sounds like a '50s ballad or something."
  • The Bravery started working up songs for Stir The Blood in an abandoned church in rural upstate New York, which years ago housed The B-52's as they recorded "Love Shack." The group then hooked up with co-producer John Hill (M.I.A., Santigold) in Manhattan. Endicott told Billboard: "He taught us a lot of ways to manipulate synthesizers and guitars in a way that we had never done before, so the album sounds spacier."

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