Do You Love Me

Album: Do You Love Me (1962)
Charted: 3
  • This was written by Motown president Berry Gordy, who wrote it for The Temptations, but they failed to arrive for the recording session. At the same time but in a different Motown studio, The Contours arrived to record "It Must Be Love," but Gordy had other ideas - he asked them to cut "Do You Love Me" instead. The song became one of Motown's first hits, its sexy sound standing out among the much more tame offerings on the charts, which were dominated by artists like Neil Sedaka and The Four Seasons.

    As for The Temptations, it was another two years before they finally had their hit ("The Way You Do The Things You Do"), but when they did, they became the premier male act on the Motown roster.
  • Joe Billingslea of The Contours told Mojo magazine February 2009 the story of this song: "We had just left the record hop and we turned at the studio. The doors were always open in those days. Berry was down there at the piano and he said 'I want you to try this song I'm writing.' He told us how he wanted the backgrounds to go and we sang it. 'Try it again, I didn't quite like it,' he said. After about the third time he said, 'That's not right. I think I'll give it to The Temptations instead.' I told him not to. We did it again and he said, 'That's exactly how I want it. Come in tomorrow morning, we're going to record it.' So we did.

    I didn't like the song. It reminded me of 'Twist And Shout.' I said: 'This song ain't gonna do nothin', man.' That same week it was released and the following week it made the charts. I turned around and said: I love that song! Did I change my opinion? Of course! We realized later that The Temptations could never have sung that song because it wasn't suited to them but Berry had motivated us to sing it the way he wanted it."
  • This song peaked in popularity just as Motown launched their first "Motortown Revue" tour to showcase their acts. The Countours were stars of the show, igniting crowds with "Do You Love Me." Lower on the bill were some other Motown acts that had yet to hit, including Marvin Gaye, Little Stevie Wonder, and The Supremes.
  • After being featured in the 1988 movie Dirty Dancing, this was re-released 26 years after it was originally recorded. This time, it charted at #11. The song was a good fit for Dirty Dancing, which despite featuring some modern, original songs, was set in 1963. This was a great song of that era for a dance scene.
  • The Dave Clark Five recorded this in 1964 as the British Invasion was underway. Their rendition hit #11 in the US. On March 8, 1964, The DC5 played it on the first of their 12 appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Bertrand - Paris, France
  • In his autobiography To Be Loved, recalls a confrontation with Motown's primary bass player, James Jamerson, over this song. Jamerson, who is lauded as a creator of the Motown sound, was playing a jazz beat during the session despite Berry's instructions. "You've got to stay on the f--kin' downbeat," Berry told him, hoping he wouldn't have to kick his star bassist out of the session. When they rolled for the next take, Jamerson did as instructed, playing the pop groove Gordy requested... until Berry took his eyes off him. "In that split second, Jamerson hit four or five jazz upbeats in rapid succession," Gordy recalled. "I turned to let him have it, but before I could say anything he had jumped back on the downbeat so brilliantly I could only smile."
  • In 1963, London group Brian Poole And The Tremeloes recorded a version that topped the charts in 16 countries including the UK.
  • This song featured in a 2016 Pepsi commercial starring Janelle Monáe. In the spot, which debuted during the Super Bowl, Monáe dances to the song before entering another room where she goes through a time warp and joins in the celebration to Madonna's "Express Yourself."
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Comments: 18

  • Jennifur Sun from RamonaDoes anyone know who played on this song besides James. it will always be one of my fav Funk Brothers sessions, although I have to admit I love the DC5 version better_Mike smith could out sing them dudes with one hand behind his back.
  • Jennifur Sun from RamonaI understand that the Funk Brothers who played on this song didn't think it would be a hit.
  • Eugene from Los Angeles"Do you love me?" was the answer to another song (can't remember the name or artist) where the female artist says that doesn't she love some guy because he couldn't dance (As you can tell by the beginning of the song).
  • Babbling Babette from Tulsa OkI love the drums on this hit song. Love to dance the mashed potato or the funky chicken to it. My oldest sis got this record in 1962 when she was in junior high school & added it to her dance hits collection. I inherited it from her in 2013 when he passed away. Lots of memories are in those records. Nowadays no one has ever heard of the Sixties' dance hits like this Contour's hit and some like Loco-Motion, Wah-Watusi, Slow Twistin', Mashed Potato Time, The Monster Mash, Twist & Shout, Dear Lady Twist, the Arkansas Twist, Do The Bird, etc. My sis Roxy would tell me all about the 1960 thru 1963 era of dance crazes. Too bad the Contours didn't have many other hits. They had a raw sound, so maybe that didn't fit in well with R&B or pop of that period. Still, the song seems to be popular for TV ads, movie soundtracks, etc. Aw, but now I'm babbling.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn April 26th 1964, Dave Clark Five's covered version of "Do You Love Me" entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #53; and five weeks later on May 31st, 1964 it just missed making the Top 10 when it peaked at #11 {for 1 week} and it spent 10 weeks on the Top 100...
    Was track five of side one on the British quintet's debut album, 'Glad All Over'...
    Two other tracks from the album also made the Top 100, and both reached the Top 10; "Glad All Over" {at #6} and "Bits and Pieces" {at #4}...
    Sadly, three members of the DC5 have passed away; Denis Payton {1943 - 2006}, Mike Smith {1943 - 2008}, and Rick Huxley {1940 - 2013}...
    May all three R.I.P.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn October 26th 1962, the very first Motor Town Revue tour debut in Washington, DC...
    At the time there were three 'Motown' acts on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; at #3 was "Do You Love Me" by the Contours {#2 on the R&B chart}, at #49 was "You Beat Me to the Punch" by Mary Wells {#5 R&B}, and at #96 was "Stubborn Kind of Fellow" by Marvin Gaye {#13 R&B}...
    Plus the Marvelettes had two records on the R&B Singles chart; "Someday, Someway" at #14 and "Beechwood 4-5789" at #22.
  • Dennis from Lewisville, TxI saw the American Bandstand show in '62 and it seemed like the engineers rather than Dick Clark cut the song short. Dick had them do the last few bars again and they again cut it short again so he made them do the ending a third time and they finally let the song go all the way to the end.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyWhen the Contours performed this song on American Bandstand in 1962 Dick Clark goofed up their ending. At the slight pause at the end of the record Dick walked in front of the group and started to interview them. When he realized his mistake he made up for it by letting them lip sync the complete song over again...
  • John from Nashville, TnThe Contours never had another big hit after "Do You Love Me", but the comical "First I Look At The Purse" (written by Smokey Robinson)and "Just A Little Misunderstanding" (co-written by a 17-year old Stevie Wonder) became underground soul classics.
  • Henry from Kingston, NyThe Dave Clark 5 did a good version of this, too.
  • Fyodor from Denver, CoSometimes the dumbest songs can be the funnest.
  • Johnny from Los Angeles, CaThis song gets to much credit. I don't like it.
  • Henry from Kingston, NyNikki, in "Ferris Beller's Day Off" Ferris sings "Twist and Shout", not this song.
  • Nikki from Remington, VaYou seem to be forgetting the movie "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" where the song was perfromed by Ferris(Matthew Broderick) , in a parade.
  • Matt from Millbrae, CaNirvana would play this regularly at concerts and even recorded their own version (available as a bootleg i think).
  • Sal from Ny, Nylots of people covered this, probably it's caus eit's so fun to lsiten to
  • Brett from Edmonton, CanadaThe Blues Brothers did an entertaining cover of this.
  • Robert from Topeka, KsAfter the group refused to "clean up and dress up" like the other groups in Barry Gordy's "family", they were fired.
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