A Forest

Album: Seventeen Seconds (1980)
Charted: 31
  • "A Forest," from The Cure's Seventeen Seconds album, tells a vague story of pursuit of a girl in a forest, which ends in loss. Many fans and critics regard this song in particular as a good example of The Cure's unique sound.
  • This song represents several firsts for The Cure: It garnered them their first appearance on the BBC's Top of the Pops program. The album is also the only one to feature Matthieu Hartley on the keyboards exclusively. And finally, it was the first Cure single to be released on the 12-inch single record format - the alternative 7-inch record single omits the initial guitar-and-keyboard introduction, skips a few bars between the verses, and it goes to a fade-out sooner in the guitar solo ending. All this makes it two minutes shorter on the smaller single.
  • This song is behind a famous incident. At the 1981 Werchter Festival in Belgium, The Cure were on before Robert Palmer and were just finishing their set. Robert Palmer, apparently getting a little pushy, tried to have his road crew hurry The Cure off the stage. Robert Smith responded by sassily informing the crowd that they couldn't play anymore, then played an extra-long 9-minute version of "A Forest." Bass player Simon Gallup put a stamp on the performance by shouting "F--k Robert Palmer" to a cheering crowd! See this priceless Cure moment here.

Comments: 1

  • Patricia from New York, NyActually, Simon Gallup, bass, was the one who shouted "F--k Robert Palmer, F--k Rock and Roll." And according to an account in the Cure's bio "10 Imaginary Years" the roadies for Robert Palmer responded by throwing the Cure's amps off the stage.
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