Moind Yer Hid Boy

Album: The Singing Postman (1964)

Songfacts®:

  • "Moind Yer Hid Boy" is a typical Allan Smethurst composition, based partly on personal experience, its thesis is that a lot of people would still be alive today if they'd taken the care to mind their heads.
  • The song contains a reference to "Granny Polly, Stewkey Blues". Stiffkey - to give it its correct name - was where his mother was born; Granny Polly was actually his great-grandmother; Smethurst is quoted by Keith Skipper in his biography of The Singing Postman: "Right up to the war years I spent every holiday with my Great Granny in Stiffkey, and I was never happier than at these times".
  • The song appeared on his initial Ralph Tuck Promotions EP which was shortly re-issued on the EMI label as First Delivery, and has the same rustic charm as "Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy?" although if anything it is a stronger number, and quite possibly the strongest song he ever wrote. As with most Allan Smethurst ditties, it is performed by the Singing Postman accompanying himself on his acoustic guitar.
    The score - as "Mind Your Head Boy" - can be found in the 1966 Dick James publication Songs of The Singing Postman Allan Smethurst Souvenir Album. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 3

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