Exiles

Album: Crooked Timber (2009)

Songfacts®:

  • Vocalist Andy Cairns told entertainnment.ie that he is fond of this song, "because I was listening to a lot of Code 9, Benga and a lot of dubstep. Obviously we're not going to use a lot of electronics, so we did it all with guitar and bass. I like the groove of it; it's something like 130 beats per minute. I like how the guitar is kind of sparse apart from certain places where there are little effects on it."

    Cairns added that dubstep was an influence on Crooked Timber. He explained: "Some of the vocal effects came from dubstep but we had to tone it down a little bit because I could get a little carried away! I really like that track 'Archangel' by Burial off the Untrue album. They were going that this is like the thing that Cher used to do! (Producer) Andy Gill was saying 'well, let's make it sound like you but let's not go down the f--king Cher route!' It had to be reigned in a bit so people weren't thinking 'who's that f--king alien singing for Therapy?!' (laughs)."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Gilby ClarkeSongwriter Interviews

The Guns N' Roses rhythm guitarist in the early '90s, Gilby talks about the band's implosion and the side projects it spawned.

Yacht Rock QuizFact or Fiction

Christopher Cross with Deep Purple? Kenny Loggins in Caddyshack? A Fact or Fiction all about yacht rock and those who made it.

The Truth Is Out There: A History of Alien SongsSong Writing

The trail runs from flying saucer songs in the '50s, through Bowie, blink-182 and Katy Perry.

Jesus Thinks You're a Jerk: Rock vs. TelevangelistsSong Writing

When televangelists like Jimmy Swaggart took on rockers like Ozzy Osbourne and Metallica, the rockers retaliated. Bono could even be seen mocking the preachers.

Macabre Mother Goose: The Dark Side of Children's SongsSong Writing

"London Bridge," "Ring Around the Rosie" and "It's Raining, It's Pouring" are just a few examples of shockingly morbid children's songs.

Michael Glabicki of Rusted RootSongwriter Interviews

Michael tells the story of "Send Me On My Way," and explains why some of the words in the song don't have a literal meaning.