Jingle Bells

Album: Bing Crosby Christmas (1857)
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  • Lyrics
  • Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh,
    Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh

    Dashing through the snow
    In a one-horse open sleigh
    O'er the fields we go
    Laughing all the way
    Bells on bob-tail ring
    Making spirits bright
    What fun it is to ride and sing
    A sleighing song tonight

    Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh, oh
    Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh

    Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleigh,
    Jingle bells, jingle bells
    Jingle all the way,
    Oh what fun it is to ride
    In a one-horse open sleighWriter/s: Traditional Traditional
    Publisher: Spirit Music Group, Royalty Network
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
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Comments: 4

  • Kevin from Salt Lake City, UtBarbra Streisand's "Jingle Bells" (with a decidedly jazz/triplet feel and an original verse) has become a new standard arrangement copied or quoted by a number of artists including Straight No Chaser, Barry Manilow, and Pentatonix.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn November 11, 1960, Santo and Johnny performed "Twistin' Bells" on the Dick Clark ABC-TV weekday-afternoon program 'American Bandstand'...
    One month later on December 19th the song entered Billboard's Top 100 chart at position #78, the following week it was at #61, and then on it's third and final week on the chart it peaked at #49...
    Between 1959 and 1964 the Brooklyn, NY brothers had six records on the Top 100 chart, one made the Top 10 and it reached #1, "Sleep Walk", for two weeks on September 21st, 1959...
    And from the 'For What It's Worth" department; seems this was the era of the instrumentals, the week "Twistin' Bells" peaked at #49 there were fourteen other instrumentals on the Top 100 at the time, "Wonderland By Night" by Bert Kaempfert {#2}, "Last Date" by Floyd Cramer {#3}, "Exodus" by Ferrante & Teicher {#4}, "Wonderland By Night" by Louis Prima {#16}, "Perfidia" by the Ventures {#17}, "Calcutta" by Lawrence Welk {#22}, "Blue Tango" by Bill Black's Combo {#26}, "Gonzo" by James Booker {#43}, "Last Date" by Lawrence Welk {#55}, "Magnificent Seven" by Al Caiola {#58}, "(Let's Do) the Hully Gully" by Bill Doggett {#58}, "Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White" by Jerry Murad's Harmonicats {#70}, "Pepe" by Duane Eddy {#74}, and "Wabash Blues" by the Viscounts {#89}.
  • Terry from Willmar, MnPierpont was writing about what teenage boys like to do: race and scare girls. The song is simply about boys getting the fastest sleigh (the cutter or one horse open sleigh), the fastest horse, and then race each other. And if they're lucky, get a girl to sit next to them, go around corners fast, and then listen to the girls scream while they snuggle up and hold onto the boy's arm.
  • Mary from Phoenix, AzI love Bing Crosby's version. Makes ya wanna dance!
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