Signs

  • songfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • Two ravens in the old oak tree, one for you and one for me
    Bluebells in the late December, I see signs now all the time
    The last time we slept together, there was something that was not there
    You never wanted to alarm me but I'm the one that's drowning now

    I could sleep forever these days because in my dreams I see you again
    But this time fleshed out fuller face in your confirmation dress
    It was so like you to visit me to let me know you were OK
    It was so like you to visit me, always worrying about someone else

    At your funeral I was so upset, so upset,
    In your life you were larger than this
    Statuesque

    I see signs now all the time that your not dead your sleeping
    I believe in anything that brings you back home to meWriter/s: Russell Lissack, Kele Okereke
    Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Jim McCarty of The YardbirdsSongwriter Interviews

The Yardbirds drummer explains how they created their sound and talks about working with their famous guitarists.

Into The Great Wide Open: Made-up MusiciansSong Writing

Eddie (played by Johnny Depp in the video) found fame fleeting, but Chuck Berry's made-up musician fared better.

George HarrisonFact or Fiction

Did Eric Clapton really steal George's wife? What's the George Harrison-Monty Python connection? Set the record straight with our Fact or Fiction quiz.

Macabre Mother Goose: The Dark Side of Children's SongsSong Writing

"London Bridge," "Ring Around the Rosie" and "It's Raining, It's Pouring" are just a few examples of shockingly morbid children's songs.

Matthew Wilder - "Break My Stride"They're Playing My Song

Wilder's hit "Break My Stride" had an unlikely inspiration: a famous record mogul who rejected it.

Phone Booth SongsSong Writing

Phone booths are nearly extinct, but they provided storylines for some of the most profound songs of the pre-cell phone era.