Who Killed Davey Moore?

Album: The Bootleg Series (1963)
  • Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?

    "Not I," says the referee,
    "Don't point your finger at me.
    I could've stopped it in the eighth
    An' maybe kept him from his fate,
    But the crowd would've booed, I'm sure,
    At not gettin' their money's worth.
    It's too bad he had to go,
    But there was a pressure on me too, you know.
    It wasn't me that made him fall.
    No, you can't blame me at all."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?

    "Not us," says the angry crowd,
    Whose screams filled the arena loud.
    "It's too bad he died that night
    But we just like to see a fight.
    We didn't mean for him t' meet his death,
    We just meant to see some sweat,
    There ain't nothing wrong in that.
    It wasn't us that made him fall.
    No, you can't blame us at all."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?

    "Not me," says his manager,
    Puffing on a big cigar.
    "It's hard to say, it's hard to tell,
    I always thought that he was well.
    It's too bad for his wife an' kids he's dead,
    But if he was sick, he should've said.
    It wasn't me that made him fall.
    No, you can't blame me at all."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?


    "Not me," says the gambling man,
    With his ticket stub still in his hand.
    "It wasn't me that knocked him down,
    My hands never touched him none.
    I didn't commit no ugly sin,
    Anyway, I put money on him to win.
    It wasn't me that made him fall.
    No, you can't blame me at all."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?

    "Not me," says the boxing writer,
    Pounding print on his old typewriter,
    Sayin', "Boxing ain't to blame,
    There's just as much danger in a football game."
    Sayin', "Fist fighting is here to stay,
    It's just the old American way.
    It wasn't me that made him fall.
    No, you can't blame me at all."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for?

    "Not me," says the man whose fists
    Laid him low in a cloud of mist,
    Who came here from Cuba's door
    Where boxing ain't allowed no more.
    "I hit him, yes, it's true,
    But that's what I am paid to do.
    Don't say 'murder,' don't say 'kill.'
    It was destiny, it was God's will."

    Who killed Davey Moore,
    Why an' what's the reason for? Writer/s: BOB DYLAN
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 2

  • 2112 from Mahopac, NyI like this song even though I disagree with its logic.
  • Davia from Springfield, OhThis comment is for Bob Dylan. I am the 5th born of Davey Moore 1933-1963. I was born September 19th 1960. My name is Davia S. Moore (Mills) please e-mail me at davia_mills@hotmail.com
see more comments

Editor's Picks

Spot The Real Red Hot Chili Peppers Song Titles

Spot The Real Red Hot Chili Peppers Song TitlesMusic Quiz

The Red Hot Chili Peppers have some rather unusual song titles - see if you can spot the real ones.

The Untold Story Of Fiona Apple's Extraordinary Machine

The Untold Story Of Fiona Apple's Extraordinary MachineSong Writing

Fiona's highly-anticipated third album almost didn't make it. Here's how it finally came together after two years and a leak.

Jesus In Pop Hits: The Gospel Songs That Went Mainstream

Jesus In Pop Hits: The Gospel Songs That Went MainstreamSong Writing

These overtly religious songs crossed over to the pop charts, despite resistance from fans, and in many cases, churches.

Dave Alvin - "4th Of July"

Dave Alvin - "4th Of July"They're Playing My Song

When Dave recorded the first version of the song with his group the Blasters, producer Nick Lowe gave him some life-changing advice.

Ron and Russell Mael of Sparks

Ron and Russell Mael of SparksSongwriter Interviews

The men of Sparks on their album Hippopotamus, and how Morrissey handled it when they suggested he lighten up.

Phone Booth Songs

Phone Booth SongsSong Writing

Phone booths are nearly extinct, but they provided storylines for some of the most profound songs of the pre-cell phone era.