The Dark Girl Dress'd In Blue

Album: various (1862)
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  • From a village away in Leicestershire to London here I came
    To see the Exhibition and all places of great fame
    But what I suffered since I came I now will tell to you
    How I lost my heart and senses too, thro' a dark girl dress'd in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    'Twas on a Friday morning the first day of August
    When of that day I ever think my heart feels ready to bust
    I went in a six-penny omnibus to the Exhibition of sixty-two
    On a seat by the right hand side of the door sat a dark girl dress'd in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    When we arrived in the Brompton Road the lady looked so strange
    The conductor he said, 'Sixpence, Ma'am' Said she, 'I have no change
    I've nothing less than a five pound note, whatever shall I do?'
    Said I, 'Allow me to pay' 'Oh thank you, sir'
    Said the dark girl dress'd in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    We chatted and talked as we onward walked about one thing or the other
    She asked me too, oh wasn't it kind? If I had a father or mother
    Oh yes, says I, and a grandmother too, but pray, miss, what are you?
    'Oh, I'm chief engineer in a Milliner's Shop
    Says the dark girl dressed in blue'

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    We walked about for an hour or two, thro' buildings near and far
    Till we came to the grand refreshment room, I went straight up to the bar
    She slipped in my hand a five pound note I said, 'What are you going to do?'
    'Oh don't think it strange I must have change'
    Said the dark girl dressed in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    I called a waiter and handed him the note
    And said, 'Please change me that'
    The waiter bowed and touched his hair for this waiter wore no hat
    In silver and gold five pounds he brought, I gave him coppers few
    And the change of the note I then did hand
    To the dark girl dressed in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    She thanked me and said, 'I must away, farewell till we meet again
    For I've got to go to Pimlico to catch the Brighton train
    She quickly glided from my sight and soon was lost to view
    I turned to leave when by my side stood a tall man dressed in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    This tall man said, 'Excuse me, sir, I'm one of the X division
    That note was bad, my duty is to take you on suspicion'
    Said I, 'For a lady I obtained the change'
    He said, 'Are you telling me true?'
    Where's she live? What's her name? says I, 'I don't know
    She was a dark girl dressed in blue

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh

    My story they believed, they thought I'd been deceived
    But they said I must hand back the cash
    I thought 'twas a sin as I gave them the tin
    And away went five pounds smash
    So all young men take my advice, be careful what you do
    When you make the acquaintance of ladies strange
    Especially a 'dark girl dressed in blue'

    She was a fine girl, fol de riddle I do
    A charmer, fol de riddle eh Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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