She's Not There

Album: The Zombies (1964)
Charted: 12 2
  • Well, no one told me about her
    The way she lied
    Well, no one told me about her
    How many people cried

    But it's too late to say you're sorry
    How would I know, why should I care?
    Please don't bother trying to find her
    She's not there

    Well, let me tell you 'bout the way she looked
    The way she acts and the color of her hair
    Her voice was soft and cool, her eyes were clear and bright
    But she's not there

    Well, no one told me about her
    What could I do?
    Well, no one told me about her
    Though they all knew

    But it's too late to say you're sorry
    How would I know, why should I care?
    Please don't bother trying to find her
    She's not there

    Well, let me tell you about the way she looked
    The way she acts and the color of her hair
    Her voice was soft and cool, her eyes were clear and bright
    But she's not there

    But it's too late to say you're sorry
    How would I know, why should I care?
    Please don't bother trying to find her
    She's not there

    Well, let me tell you about the way she looked
    The way she acts and the color of her hair
    Her voice was soft and cool, her eyes were clear and bright
    But she's not there Writer/s: Rodney Terence Argent
    Publisher: MARQUIS SONGS USA
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 22

  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn this day in 1964 {December 6th} "She's Not There" by The Zombies peaked at #2 {for 1 week} on Billboard's Top 100 chart, for the week it was at #2, the #1 record for that week was "Mr. Lonely" by Bobby Vinton...
    "She's Not There" also reached #2 on the Canadian RPM Top Singles chart...
    Between 1964 and 1969 the St. Albans, England band had five records on the Billboard's Top 100 chart, three made the Top 10 with their biggest hit being the above "She's Not There"...
    Besides "She's Not There", their other Top 10 records were "Tell Her No" at #6 for two weeks in February of 1965 and "Time of The Season" at #3 for two weeks in March of 1969...
    In their native England they had two charted records, "She's Not There" {at #12} and "Tell Her No" {at #42}...
    Guitarist Paul Atkinson passed away at the young age of 58 on April 1st, 2004 {liver and kidney disease}...
    And from the 'For What's It Worth' department, the remainder of the Billboard's Top 10 on December 6th, 1964:
    At #3. "Ringo" by Lorne Greene
    #4. "Come See About Me" by The Supremes
    #5. "I Feel Fine" by The Beatles
    #6. "Time Is On My Side" by The Rolling Stones
    #7. "You Really Got Me" by The Kinks
    #8. "Baby Love" by The Supremes
    #9. "I'm Gonna Be Strong" by Gene Pitney
    #10. "Dance, Dance, Dance" by The Beach Boys
  • Arthur from Methuen, MaThis is probably the most covered song I know of. Not only did Santana cover it, but the band "The Road" had a hit with it, and so did "Vanilla Fudge".
  • David from Lakeland, FlIn the beginning of the song you can hear his lips smack before he says "the way she lied". Zombies version is better than Santana in my opinion.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn January 12th, 1965, the Zombies performed "She's Not There" on the NBC-TV program 'Hullabaloo'...
    This was the debut episode of 'Hullabaloo'; its last show was on April 11th, 1966 after a grand total of first run 48 episodes.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn December 6th, 1964, "She's Not There" by the Zombies peaked at #2 (for 1 week) on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; it had entered the chart on October 31st, 1964 and spent 15 weeks on the Top 100...
    The record that kept it out of the top spot was "Mr. Lonely" by Bobby Vinton.
  • Natu from Addis Ababa, EthiopiaI first heard Santana's version; the keyboard intro, the vocals and the hypnotizing solo....like they did in 'Black magic woman' they give this song a 'touch of grace'.
  • Richard from Bexhill On Sea, United KingdomThe Herts Beat competition they won was in fact at Watford Town Hall in front of several thousand people. I know - I was in one of the other bands!
  • Roman from Barrie, OnRecently (Sept. '11) scored front row seats for their concert at a local casino. With the freedom of performing live, they were better than on a CD. Not a single soul in the audience under 40. They performed some new songs from a new CD as well. Colin sang his heart out and Rod played the daylights out of his keyboards !
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyThree of the five records that The Zombies released in the USA made the Top 10; In 1964 "She's Not There" was #2 for one week, then "Tell Her No" peaked at #6 in 1965, and finally "Time of the Season" reached #3 in 1969!!!
  • Constance from Dallas, TxYes this song was covered on Kill Bill 2, however it is like a remix not the whole song. It just takes a few lines from the orignal song "She's Not There" mixed with a song from the great African American jazz/blues singer Bessie Smith for the 1930's "My Man". It has a slow cool hip beat remix.
  • Snow from Sierra Foothills, CaWell, I am amazed!!I still get those goose bumps. 1967 to 2009. I feel that a natural voice came out. It is very seldom to hear. The catching of one's breath as you put forth your emotions in song. I do thank the Zombies....Snow
  • Musicmama from New York, NyThis song plays a prominent role of novelist Jennifer Boylan's eponymous memoir. That book tells the story of her evolution from a boy/man named James, and the song recurs in it, like thunder muttering through some dream one gets drunk or high in order to forget, and returns at the moment she realizes she can no longer live as a man. I have always loved this song, but it means even more to me now because of Jennifer Boylan's book, which also means a lot to me because I've taken the same journey that she's made.
  • James from Arlington, TxFor those wondering about the Kill Bill song, it's on Kill Bill Vol. 2: "About Her" by Malcolm McLaren.
  • Dave from Cardiff, Wales"I like how Santana makes this song a Santana song" - not entirely true Johnny, there's no such thing as an artists taking someone else's song and making it their own. The only way in which Santana's version was radically different was that they added an all-new introduction and they also re-worked the ending so that it faded out instead of ending after the final chrous instead, other than that it wasn't really that different. That said, I did like the high-octane blues guitars Carlos Santana used in the cover
  • Stefanie from Rock Hill, ScI didn't know songs with e;lectric pianos were that rare. The piano part is good on the original version.
  • Jon from Oakridge, OrHello Stefanie.
  • Jon from Oakridge, OrIt WAS covered in Kill Bill milen,Sofia,Bulgaria. It's in the 2nd soundtrack. That's one of the reasons I have it.
  • Johnny from Los Angeles, CaI like how Santana makes this song a Santana song, makes it much different from the original. Steph: Covered by Santana not too long after. very good cover, I might add. Me: Steph, not so long after? That's longer then I have been alive!
  • Milen from Sofia, BulgariaIsn't that song covered in Kill Bill's soundtrack.?
  • Dave from Cardiff, WalesI didn't like Santana's version as much as the original; it was still very good as covers go, though
  • Stefanie Magura from Rock Hill, ScYeah! The cover's great! I've heard it.
  • Steph from Ottawa, CanadaCovered by Santana not too long after. Very good cover, I might add.
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