Hanno The Navigator

Album: Sparks of Ancient Light (2008)

Songfacts®:

  • Running to some 4 minutes 17 seconds, "Hanno The Navigator" is another song in the genre of historical folk rock from the man who invented it, though here we are on the borders of mythology, as Hanno II of Carthage lived c500BC, so what little we know of him has been transcribed from ancient tablets.

    There is a mention here of an encounter with a particularly hirsute tribe, which according to one contemporary account may actually have been a colony of gorillas!

    As usual for Al Stewart, the song is strong melodically, rather stronger than lyrically in this case to be totally objective, but this is basically a fun track. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

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