Grow

Album: The Good Parts (2017)

Songfacts®:

  • Andy Grammer is a member of the Bahá'í Faith, which regards all the major religions as fundamentally unified in purpose. Here, he sings about the human need to keep working on becoming a better person.

    Love yourself and be kind, water your soul
    Celebrate, find your light
    It don't matter who you are, where you're going, you're not old
    We all know, yeah, we all know
    Gotta grow


    Grammer explained to Billboard: "I just love these kind of laws of the universe. My obsession is how do you take things that are almost scientific laws of emotions or what it's like to be alive and try to write it out in a pop song? And so, yeah, you gotta grow. We all have to keep growing. The only way that you're happy is when you keep growing."

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