Stoney End

Album: Stoney End (1970)
Charted: 27 6
  • This was from Streisand's first album of songs that weren't from Broadway/film musicals and weren't standards. On the album, she recorded two songs written by Laura Nyro, including "Stoney End."
  • Producer Richard Perry looked at several Laura Nyro songs for Barbra Streisand to sing on her second Pop-Rock album. He selected this song and convinced Streisand to sing it, despite her not being comfortable with the line "I was raised on the good book, Jesus." It was Streisand's biggest Hot 100 hit until "Evergreen."
  • Many of Streisand's fans were initially bothered by this song because it had more of a Rock feel, with heavy bass and drums and her searing vocal. It was Streisand's biggest Pop/Rock hit until "Evergreen" in 1976.
  • Richard Perry produced this album with Phil Ramone as the engineer. Ramone would later produce several Streisand albums. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Ken - Louisville, KY, for all above
  • Nyro recorded this in 1967 on her album More Than a New Discovery. In 1968, Peggy Lipton recorded it.
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Comments: 12

  • John from Wildwood NjThis song is ridiculous I think that Barbra Streisand should be ashamed. The Christian faith is powerful the word is powerful the word is very important. To turn away from Jesus is not good and I know Barbra Streisand didn't write this song but if she has faith in Jesus she will be saved.
  • Bart from Dumont, NjDoing some looking around the Internet, the meaning of the song seems clear to me, especially if you hear Nyro's alternative lyrics (findable on Youtube) and the time in which the song was written (1966). The singer is a young woman who has sex with a man who she thinks loves him, but it turns out to be just a one night stand for him. I have read some accounts that "stoney end" implies that she was drunk or on drugs when this happens; she doesn't want to be yet another woman who gets stoned and has meaningless sex. There is a further implication that she loses her virginity to that man (which would explain her extremely strong reaction and desire to turn back the clock). And to those who say that it is about her coming to terms with her lesbianism, well, she was bisexual, not a lesbian, and there is nothing in the the Old Testament prohibiting lesbianism or an unmarried woman having sex. The first verse is implying that reading "between the lines" is a cause of her not wanting to see the morning.
  • Howard from St. Louis Park, Mn To me, it's my all time favorite Barbra Streisand song. Nowadays, it doesn't get played very much on oldies stations and I never get tired of playing it on various websites. I have also heard he original version by Laura Nyro and it is also outstanding.
  • Clinton Schwind from Tracy, CaThis is the first Barbra Streisand song that I can remember hearing on the radio growing up. I always thought the album cover was really cool, it just grabbed my attention. I was seven.
  • Warren Ellis from Washington, DcI believe that Stoney End was her biggest hit before The Way We Were, not Evergreen.
  • Jeanie from Alto, GaI only have one thing to add. JLS in LA, CA - "suposably" isn't a word. I think you must have meant "supposedly". Sorry, that is one of my biggest pet peeves.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn January 17th 1971, "Stoney End" by Barbra Streisand peaked at #6 (for 1 week) on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart; it had entered the chart on October 25th, 1970 and spent 18 weeks on the Top 100...
    It reached #2 on Billboard's Adult Contemporary Tracks chart...
    Was track 6 on her twelfth studio album of the same name; it peaked at #10 on Billboard's Top 200 Albums chart...
    Two other tracks off the album also charted on the Top 100, and both were also composed by Laura Nyro ("Time and Love" at #51 and "Flim Flam Man" at #82)...
    R.I.P. Ms. Nyro, born Laura Nigro, (1947 - 1997) and Ms. Streisand will celebrated her 72nd birthday in three months on April 24th (2014).
  • Alan from White Lake, MiA great song sung by a great artist by a great writer. rip laura
  • Camille from Toronto, OhYeah, this is a great tune. I loved to hear it back in the 70s, but I don't think I knew till now the title of it was "Stoney End". I can understand why it was such a big hit for Barbra. She rocks out the lyrics, written by the genius that is known as Laura Nyro.
  • Jls from La, CaJo, so, from TX. Nah this was not her struggle with lesbianism though she had a relationship with Maria Desidereo for the last 17 years of her life. It is suposably about her father, Lou. Luie was not about her father, but this was a liberation from his control over her music and her feelings about her ownership of her talent. So told to me from inside her family. Who knows though. Either way its a wonderful pop song, and fits in even today.
  • Jo from So Tx, TxThis song was written by Laura Nyro. It is about her struggle with her lesbianism. Laura was raised with a religious education. She was very close to her mother and adored her, as per her father. She married but her marriage dissolved.Her feelings and passions raged within her. When she let go to of her feelings she wished she could start over again and wanted the security of her mother cradeling her again. "She was raised with the book of Jesus till she read between the lines..." She never wanted to go down the stoney end.... In biblical times women who did not adhere to religious conformity were stoned
  • Mark from Lancaster, OhThis and Carole King's "Where You Lead" were my favorite Streisand songs. Neither one likely pleased her more traditional fans, but they were both great.
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