Sally

Album: Yet to be titled (2016)

Songfacts®:

  • Bibi Bourelly is a German singer-songwriter signed to Def Jam Recordings and based in Los Angeles. She has written a number of songs recorded by Rihanna, including "Bitch Better Have My Money" and "Higher." Bourelly's gritty vocals have also featured on several hit singles such as Nick Brewer's "Talk To Me" and Usher's "Chains." This single was released in preparation for the release of her debut studio album.
  • The track is a note to herself. "Sally is just a song that I wrote talking to my alter ego," Bourelly explained to Billboard magazine. "When I write, I don't really consciously say, 'This is what I've been going through in my life and I'm gonna put this into words.' It's just a song that I kinda went in and did then listening back to it, I realized, 'I'm talking to myself.'"
  • Sally isn't Bourelly's real-life alter ego. She said: "I'm not like Beyoncé and Sasha Fierce but in that moment [writing the song], I was being too much of a bitch to say 'Bibi' so I said 'Sally.'"

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