Brush Up Your Shakespeare

Album: Kiss Me, Kate (1948)

Songfacts®:

  • This Cole Porter composition, from the musical Kiss Me, Kate, is a humorous ditty explaining how to pull the birds, as evinced by the forced rhymes - although no man of letters would put it quite like that.
    In the original 1948 production it was introduced by Harry Clark and Jack Diamond as the dueting gangsters. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England

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