Album: The Parade (2014)
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Songfacts®:

  • The title of Catfish and the Bottlemen's debut album, Balcony, was inspired by a moment of epiphany on a rooftop in New York, where frontman Van McCann was writing this song whilst looking out across a city containing millions of strangers. "It's about being in love with the moment," he said. "It's the feeling that I have a great band, a great family and the best friends. Nothing else matters."
  • The band were thrilled when this song was featured on the soundtrack of the soccer video game, FIFA. "We used to play that game when we were kids," McCann told Radio.com. "Like, every year, because we were big soccer fans growing up. That soundtrack was why I got into The Strokes and Kings of Leon. It might seem small compared to getting a record deal or selling 10,000 tickets, but sometimes it is the little things that let you know you've made it."

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