Might As Well Get Stoned

Album: Traveller (2015)
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Songfacts®:

  • Chris Stapleton: "I wrote this song in my garage apartment that I lived in when I first moved to Nashville. One of the first and lasting friends I made in Nashville was a singer/songwriter/musician named Jimmy Stewart. I don't remember who called who or if we had just happened to wind up at my apartment. In those days, the two of us would habitually sit up all night and play fiddle tunes or listen to bluegrass songs we both loved. So anyway, this particular night we started writing a song. We got to talking about what a guy in a country song might do if he ran out whiskey. We ultimately came to the conclusion he'd probably get stoned. Once we got that part figured out, it kind of wrote itself."

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