A Fever Dream

Album: A Fever Dream (2017)
  • This song was mostly written by frontman Jonathan Higgs whilst on tour. He told BBC Radio 1's Huw Stephens:

    "I had this nice 6/8 peaceful lullaby intro and then it transforms into a completely different rhythmic feel... I wanted to give you a feeling of descending into something you don't even realize. So it's supposed to be like falling asleep or falling into a dream."
  • I hate the neighbours, they hate me too

    Jonathan Higgs explained in a Reddit AMA: "With that neighbours lyric I wanted to sum up an awful lot with something childish and blunt, there's a lot of childish lyrics on AFD, it's become the language of politics and a lot of other things."
  • Bassist Jeremy Pritchard told HMV.com why they named the album after this song. "We thought it really encapsulated the hazy vibe of the album, the kind of distorted reality, so that's the title we went with."

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