White Ferrari

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  • This slow-burning, minimal ballad finds Frank Ocean using the image of a ride in a white Ferrari as a metaphor for a fast and pure relationship with a lover.
  • When Ocean sings the line "spending each day of the year" (at the 1.45min mark), he uses the same melodic phrasing as in The Beatles' 1966 Revolver track "Here, There And Everywhere."

    Speaking in an interview at the Time 100 Gala, Ocean said that he was listening to The Beatles and The Beach Boys for inspiration while making the album.

    He also sampled another Beatles track "Flying" for the Blonde song "Seigfried."
  • Frank Ocean revealed to the New York Times that there were 50 different versions of this song, and that his younger brother's favorite didn't make the final cut. "I have a 15-year-old little brother, and he heard one of the versions, and he's like, 'You gotta put that one out, that's the one'," Ocean said. "And I was like, 'Naw, that's not the version,' because it didn't give me peace yet."
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