Creep

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  • Goat Girl singer Lottie Pendlebury wrote "Creep" about a sex pest trying to take sneaky pictures of her on a train. "That was my angry reaction to it, she explained to Q Magazine, "and may be wishing I've done more about that situation at the time."
  • Pendlebury chants "I want to smash your head in" during the chorus. "Well yeah," she laughed. "I still have hopes that the person who did it will hear it."
  • Lottie Pendlebury told NME about her encounter with the gross man on the train: "He was making me feel really uncomfortable, but also it's a song that says don't be afraid - you can smash their head in as well."
  • Lottie Pendlebury expanded on the song to Q Magazine: "It was about the frustration I felt at not doing anything. I just sat there and tried to cover my body up. Afterwards, I thought, 'why am I receiving this and why am I not standing up for myself?' And I always have that feeling, like I'm really pathetic, but these occasions shouldn't even exist, I shouldn't have to train myself to deal with it. Men need to be taught how to be human. We shouldn't feel that we should respond to rape culture, because rape culture should be nonexistent."
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