Aha!

  • This multi-tonal track builds into a distorted fairground sound pops, to quote from a Billboard review, "like a haunted jack-in the box." In fact in Heap's studio there are not only the standard guitars, drum kit and piano, but also a selection of toys such as a spinning top, megaphone and, yes, a jack-in-the-box. Heap told The Daily Telegraph July 31, 2009 that her writing usually starts on the piano, but by the time she is finished barely a trace of the original instrument remains. She said: "A piano album would be too easy. I like things that tinker with my brain. I'm creating little sound worlds for songs, like doll's houses with little staircases and rooms inside. Everything kind of relates to everything else."
    Heap then explained the toys in her studio: "I'm very lazy when it comes to making the original sound. I just grab something, whether it is an old guitar or a Jack in the Box, and record it straight into the computer. Sounds pretty rubbish. Then I go in and spend hours finding nice bits of that sound, chopping it up, layering it, doing 20 tracks, and I'll make them a little smooth and play with them like Play-Doh. And by the time I've spent two days on it, you can't really tell what it is. People can only hear one per cent of all the work that's gone into it, months and months into one song, sculpting the sound."

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