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  • This cut features Japanese speech sampled from translation software chopped-up into a sort of rap. Included among the samples is Remon Yamano's laugh from the Japanese anime television series Waiting in the Summer.
  • Robinson told Radio.com the track has roots in the late Detroit hip-hop production legend, Jay Dilla. "I very much love chipmunked-up soul beats. Just late Jay Dilla-t stuff," he explained. "I think that the reason I love soul samples is because of the Daft Punk Discovery album, which remains my favorite album of all time. So when I heard the same style of records in a hip-hop context I was really, really in love when I was younger."

    "I was messing with soul samples and made this little beat just for fun, at least I thought," Robinson continued. "Then I'd made this MP3 of taking a bunch of titles I had in a notepad and ran them through a Japanese text to speech program and it spit out this basically nonsensical Japanese text and I cut it up into this little rap and I was just so charmed by that. It's the two sides of me, very much… that's one of my favorite songs on the album."

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