Did I Let You Know

Album: I'm With You (2011)

Songfacts®:

  • Red Hot Chili Peppers' tenth studio album, I'm With You, finds the band experimenting with some Afro-pop styles which were inspired by a trip that bassist Flea and guitarist Josh Klinghoffer took to Ethiopia. This piece of social commentary about the planet incorporates Afrobeat rhythms and features the trumpet playing of Flea with Mike Bolger, who also played on Panic At The Disco's Vices and Virtues album.
  • Flea told Spin magazine about the African trip: "We've always all loved African music. Throughout our career we've played some African bits, but we never really captured it right. Josh and I tripped around Ethiopia with a group called Africa Express, which Damon Albarn [Blur, Gorillaz] organized. We saw music every night and jammed with musicians. Ethiopia is such a great country, beautiful place."

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