157 Riverside Avenue

Album: REO Speedwagon (1971)
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Songfacts®:

  • REO Speedwagon was the band's debut studio album. Released in 1971, it was the only album recorded with original singer Terry Luttrell, who would go on to sing with Starcastle. The most popular track on the record was "157 Riverside Avenue." The title refers to the Westport, Connecticut, address where the band stayed while recording the album. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Anthony - Perryville

Comments: 2

  • Sim from Cleveland RocksGot turned on to REO by my oldest brother and his friends way back when. I thought that they were very tight musically. Good times, good music back then.
  • William from Reno, NvI'll be the first. I absolutely love this song (as well as most other REO stuff. I especially like the Decade of Rock and Roll version. Too bad Gary isn't with us anymore. I guess it's true that greatness doesn't live forever. K/H D
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