Is This The Life We Really Want?

Album: Is This the Life We Really Want? (2017)

Songfacts®:

  • This is the title track of Roger Waters' fifth studio album. It was the former Pink Floyd bassist's first solo rock album in nearly 25 years since 1992's Amused to Death.
  • The politically charged song starts off with President Trump's infamous exchange with CNN's Jim Acosta. Waters then takes direct jabs at the leader of the free world. Roger Waters told Uncut:

    "The title for this album is from a poem I wrote in 2008, just before Barack Obama was elected president. It's a long rant about the Bush/Cheney/Rumsfeld debacle. But sadly during the intervening years between 2008 and 2016 - the Obama administration - nothing really changed. Obama signaled that with his attachment to drone warfare. The song The Most Beautiful Girl is it about that."

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