• Like Sweeney's hit single "From A Table Away," this cut is written from the point of view of a mistress. She told The Boot the story of the song: "My friend Brennen Leigh and I sat down and wrote 'Amy.' What a cool idea to write a song from the [mistress'] perspective, but make it first person. First of all, if the dude is telling you one thing, but both women are being told something different. Brennen and I were talking about how that happens a lot. People come up to me after shows crying, saying they've been through this. It's amazing to me the amount of people that happens to. If someone else can relate to it, I'm all about it."
  • When we spoke with Sweeney, she said that this is one of her favorite songs from the album. She also explained that just because she likes a song, doesn't mean it's a good one. "Fan validation is the test," she says. (Here's the full Sunny Sweeney interview.)

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