Feel It

Album: This Is Not a Test (2015)
Play Video

Songfacts®:

  • The instrumentation on this song pays homage to Michael Jackson. TobyMac told Billboard magazine: "The Off the Wall record was my favorite Michael Jackson record. 'Feel It' was definitely a nod in that direction - the use of percussion, the guitar part, the rhythm section and horns. It definitely has that feel about it."
  • The lyrics contain a simple yet powerful message. "I don't want to overthink faith because I want to know God's work," said TobyMac. "I want it to be passion and spirit more than knowledge, so the lyric is really simple 'I feel it in my heart, I feel it in my soul. You take our brokenness and make us beautiful.' That's how I know. Let's just focus the fact that we are broken and somehow He puts us together and makes us beautiful."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath, Heaven And Hell

Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath, Heaven And HellSongwriter Interviews

Guitarist Tony Iommi on the "Iron Man" riff, the definitive Black Sabbath song, and how Ozzy and Dio compared as songwriters.

Bill Medley of The Righteous Brothers

Bill Medley of The Righteous BrothersSongwriter Interviews

Medley looks back on "Unchained Melody" and "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" - his huge hits from the '60s that were later revived in movies.

Gentle Giant

Gentle GiantSongwriter Interviews

An interview with Ray and Derek Shulman of the progressive rock band Gentle Giant to discuss counterpoint, polyrhythms, and... Bon Jovi.

16 Songs With a Heartbeat

16 Songs With a HeartbeatSong Writing

We've heard of artists putting their hearts into their music, but some take it literally.

Tony Banks of Genesis

Tony Banks of GenesisSongwriter Interviews

Genesis' key-man re-examines his solo career and the early days of music video.

Ian Anderson: "The delight in making music is that you don't have a formula"

Ian Anderson: "The delight in making music is that you don't have a formula"Songwriter Interviews

Ian talks about his 3 or 4 blatant attempts to write a pop song, and also the ones he most connected with, including "Locomotive Breath."