California 37

Album: California 37 (2012)
  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • This is the title track of California rock band Train's sixth album. Like their previous set, Save Me, San Francisco, the record was named after a spot in their home state. "California 37 is this highway that connects Marine County to wine country," drummer Scott Underwood explained to Alternative Addiction. "It was also our route to get to the high sierras where we used to play shows- Lake Tahoe and stuff like that. We used to use that highway all the time. Pat (Monahan, vocals) and Rob (Hotchkiss, former guitarist) lived near that highway. We broke down one day on that highway in my van that kind of just stopped running on the way to a gig. There's just a lot of memories and we wanted to further our connection with San Francisco. It's our home. The more we've been talking about the last record the more we've realized how much we truly love our home as a band. Just more and more stories were coming out over the past few years and this seemed logical. It made sense for us to name it that."
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Roger McGuinn of The ByrdsSongwriter Interviews

Roger reveals the songwriting formula Clive Davis told him, and if "Eight Miles High" is really about drugs.

Rebecca St. JamesSongwriter Interviews

This Australian Christian music star found herself a California surfer guy, giving new meaning to her song "Wait For Me."

British InvasionFact or Fiction

Go beyond The Beatles to see what you know about the British Invasion.

Stephen Christian of AnberlinSongwriter Interviews

The lead singer/lyricist for Anberlin breaks down "Impossible" and covers some tracks from their 2012 album Vital.

Mark Arm of MudhoneySongwriter Interviews

When he was asked to write a song for the Singles soundtrack, Mark thought the Seattle grunge scene was already overblown, so that's what he wrote about.

Al Jourgensen of MinistrySongwriter Interviews

In the name of song explanation, Al talks about scoring heroin for William Burroughs, and that's not even the most shocking story in this one.