Lisztomania

Album: Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix (2009)
  • So sentimental
    Not sentimental no
    Romantic not discussing it
    Darling I'm down and lonely
    When were the fortunate only?
    I've been looking for something else
    Too late, too late, too late, she'll be late, too late, too late
    So go slowly discourage
    Distant from other interests
    On your favorite weekend
    Ending this love for gentlemen only
    That's where the fortunate only
    No I gotta be someone else
    These days it comes, it comes, it comes, it comes, it comes and goes

    A Lisztomania
    Think less but see it grow
    Like a riot like a riot oh
    Not easily offended
    Know how to let it go
    From the mess to the masses

    A Lisztomania
    Think less but see it grow
    Like a riot like a riot oh
    Not easily offended
    Know how to let it go
    From the mess to the masses

    Follow, misguide, stand still
    Discuss, discourage
    On this precious weekend
    Ending this love for gentlemen only
    Wealthier gentlemen only
    Now that you're lonely
    Too late, too late, too late, she'll be late, too late, too late
    So go slowly discourage
    We'll burn the pictures instead
    When it's all over we can barely discuss
    For one minute only
    Not where the fortunate only
    But I better be something else
    These days it comes, it comes, it comes, it comes, it comes and goes

    A Lisztomania
    Think less but see it grow
    Like a riot like a riot, oh
    Not easily offended
    Know how to let it go
    From the mess to the masses

    A Lisztomania
    Think less but see it grow
    Like a riot like a riot oh
    Not easily offended
    Know how to let it go
    From the mess to the masses
    Oh
    This is show time, this is show time, this is show time
    Oh
    This is show time, this is show time, this is show time
    Time, time is your love, time is your love, yes time is your love

    Time, time is your love, time is your love, yes time is your
    From the mess to the masses
    A Lisztomania
    Think less but see it grow
    Like a riot like a riot oh
    Discuss, discuss, discuss, discuss, discuss discourage Writer/s: CHRISTIAN MAZZALAI, FREDERIC MOULIN, LAURENT MAZZALAI, THOMAS CROQUET
    Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 8

  • Paul from UkThe lyrics printed for this song often mistake "she'll be late" when it is actually "jugulate."
  • Chris from Evanston, IlSeems odd that one of the songfacts is about the word "jugulate" but the lyrics provided do not include that word...

    In any case, I think these lyrics are about a guy trying (or at least wanting) to get a gal to have more vigorous sex with him. Using "Lisztomania" as a euphemism for the intense, overwhelming delight they will both experience if they ramp up their intimate encounters (i.e. Women...collapsed in orgasmic swoons while [Liszt] played). Many other phrases can be read as sexual innuendo as well: "see it grow", "it's not hard to let it go", "a mess", "do let (me)", " it comes" and even "jugulate" could refer to ejaculation rather than an artery in the neck squirting blood. In fact, the pounding rhythm of the song in general and especially the repeated lines "Do let, do let, do let..." and " it comes, it comes, it comes, it comes..." are very much like that of sexual activity leading toward orgasm.

    The arc of the story if you will, seems to be about the singer feeling love (but not the saccharine kind). wanting attention like the "fortunate" (people that are getting good sex from their partners) that he hangs out with, and wanting his situation to change. But when he does manage to get his gal away from "other interests" and they begin to become intimate in the way that she likes ("your favorite weekend ending") he isn't satisfied with the spirit of their encounter ("This love's for gentlemen only") because it doesn't fulfill his personal preference ("I gotta be someone else") for more enthusiastic activity ("Like a riot, like a riot, oh!"). Trying to get his partner to abandon her inhibitions ("Think less, but see it grow...It's not hard to let it go"), he tells her it's ok to get a little raunchy ("I'm not easily offended").

    In the bridge it sounds like neither partner is happy with the relationship and thus a confusing mix of strategies and responses result ("Follow, misguide, stand still, disgust, discourage"). Apparently the female chose to pursue a man of better means but was rejected, and when she returns to the singer for comfort, he again tries to persuade her to let him...uh, jugulate ("This love's for gentlemen only, Wealthiest gentlemen only, And now that you're lonely, Do let, do let, do let...")

    Turned down again, they break up and find it difficult to talk about what went wrong, even with friends who, like them, are without a partner ("When it's all over we can barely discuss, For one minute only, Not with the fortunate only". Reminiscing ("Thought it could have been something else"), he thinks of what they could have had together, reliving the turmoil over and over...

    *I used a different version of some of the lyrics than those on this site for my interpretation but I still think the concept is pretty much the same.

    If you ask me, these lyrics are brilliant, whether or not the composer was a native English speaker. The tempo of the music enhances these lyrics and the entire performance pulls the listener into it's throbbing emotional message. Great song.
  • Dan from New York, NyIt sounds like the song is about prostitution, and how being with a whore can make you get over things quickly, but I guess in reality, the song is nonsensical (per the singer's description as a "mash up"), as is most of their song lyrics. Perhaps it's because they are French they find it both better to sing in English and humorous to bastardize the language? Ironic, yes, but I think it's actually kinda clever and makes for good music.
  • Jena from Leavenworth, KsI could never figure out why they would make a song called "List-o-mania," so I decided to come here to SongFacts for some insight. As I began to scroll down the L's, it dawned on me right before I got to it that they must be saying "Liszt", not "list". Of course!! LOL
  • Kathryn from Phoenix, AzThis song was also used in a recent episode of the nbc show Outsourced.
  • Carrie from Concordia, KsDirk from Waukegan, IL.. How do you know the song was written by Bob Marley?
  • Indigo from Adelaide, AustraliaAlthough i have no idea what this song is about i still love it, phoenix are a great band.
  • Dirk from Waukegan, IlThis song was actually written by bob Marley on his deathbed
see more comments

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