Dancing Out in Space

Album: The Next Day (2013)

Songfacts®:

  • Producer Tony Visconti told Rolling Stone about this multi-layered celebration of dance. "That's a very uptempo one," he said. "It's got a Motown beat to it, but the rest of it is completely psychedelic. It's got very floaty vibe. There's a guy called David Torn who plays guitar, who we use; he comes with huge amounts of equipment that he creates these aural landscapes. He uses them in a rock context with all that ambient sound, and he's bending his tremolo arm and all that. It's just crazy, completely crazy sound on that track."
  • Bowie slips in a reference to Georges Rodenbach when he sings: "Silent as Georges Rodenbach. Mist and silhouette."

    Georges Rodenbach (1855 - 1898) was a Belgian Symbolist poet and novelist, who stated that silence was the thread connecting all of his work. He once wrote a poem titled Le règne du silence.

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