The Wedding Of Mr Wu

Album: Golden Greats (1933)
  • According to the Brendan Ryan catalogue and discography of the Ukulele Man's work which was commissioned by the George Formby Society, he recorded "Chinese Laundry Blues" on July 1, 1932, and married off its hero in "The Wedding Of Mr Wu" on November 12, 1933; the first take was rejected but issued later (although not on 78). The retakes were recorded the same day for both Decca and Rex.
  • This is arguably the weakest of Formby's Mr Wu songs, and is a fairly straightforward description of his marriage - to a Chinese girl, of course. The wedding was held in church, and instead of "Here Comes The Bride" they walked down the aisle to the strains of the aforementioned "Chinese Laundry Blues". If a blues seems inappropriate for such a happy occasion this could be because no sooner had the happy couple departed than Mr Wu's new wife hit him over the head with a tea set.
    Fortunately for his fans - if not for Mr Wu - Formby would go on to produce more and better songs in the same vein. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2

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